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October 22, 2008

Connecting the Dots

We can't wait to see The Lightworker's review of Bill Ayer's latest Magnum Opus:

20081022AyersBook-sm.jpg

White supremacy and its troubling endurance in American life is debated in these personal essays by two veteran political activists. Arguing that white supremacy has been the dominant political system in the United States since its earliest days—and that it is still very much with us—the discussion points to unexamined bigotry in the criminal justice system, election processes, war policy, and education. The book draws upon the authors’ own confrontations with authorities during the Vietnam era, reasserts their belief that racism and war are interwoven issues, and offers personal stories about their lives today as parents, teachers, and reformers.

Hey! Maybe they can get Jeremiah Wright - or better yet, Father Pfleger - to do the foreward!

That memory hole just keeps growing... and growing .... and growing. But cheer up, boys and girls.

November 4th is right around the corner.

Posted by Cassandra at October 22, 2008 11:36 PM

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Comments

Regarding people like Bill Ayers and Father Pfleger...what would be the term for the White version of an "Uncle Tom"?

Posted by: camojack at October 23, 2008 01:29 AM

"Bottom-feeder"...

Posted by: BillT at October 23, 2008 04:54 AM

I found it interesting that Ayers is a proponent of 'progressive' education, and he is too scary even for progressives. But then, so am I.

Posted by: Cricket at October 23, 2008 07:15 AM

I saw we take a nice sharp arrow, use a crossbow and tag that bastard Ayres right between the eyes. Then mount him on the wall in Obama's office. :)

Posted by: Rita at October 23, 2008 08:28 AM

Why do I find the most zealous militants on racism turn out to be liberal whites? So much to prove, so little time? What better way to demonstrate their nobility, enlightenment and superiority.

As a "person of color", I've had enough of the Bill Ayers of the world preaching about racism to me.

Posted by: mj at October 23, 2008 12:40 PM

I've always loved that term :p

I keep wanting to turn it into "person of cholor".

People have some interesting attitudes about race. In general, I haven't found that they are much different than they are about anything else in life -- IOW, we may have broad, general ideas about groups of people - i.e., blondes are dumb, women are overemotional, irrational, and vicious; men are abusive, insensitive, and violent; fat people are lazy and glutinous, Muslims are intolerant and backwards; Jews are greedy and are plotting to take over the universe (whatever...). I don't doubt for one moment that many people of all races, political persuasions, religions, ethnicities, etc. still hold these views.

But on an individual level I've seen that even people who believe in the most pernicious stereotypes seem quite able to set them aside when they encounter an individual who clearly doesn't 'fit the pattern'. And we deal with human beings as individuals, not as groups.

I think those stereotypes are most applicable on the public policy level, because that's the only time you tend to deal with "groups" as opposed to "individuals" and even there the negative effects of bias against certain groups tends to get muted because the way the law is weighted, we can discriminate "for" what we like to call disadvantaged minorities, but not against them. It's kind of an interesting issue. The only group we're really allowed to intentionally discriminate against (though arguably we discriminate against others unintentionally) on a statistical or public policy sense is white males.

As a woman with a husband and two sons, this bothers me.

Posted by: Cass at October 23, 2008 01:37 PM

I also think it's interesting that liberals want active govt. intervention to prevent racial discrimination, yet they seem to hold (when actually polled) some rather unprogressive racial attitudes themselves. This reminds me of the studies that show that conservatives give far more to charity than liberals do.

It's a sort of, "do as I say, not as I do" mentality. They want the government to force everyone to do something they are (evidently) not willing to do voluntarily, or punish everyone for the sins of a few (like that story in the news about the school district that is banning candy from kids' lunches brought from home b/c 11% of kids are obese, yet over 80% of these kids don't take daily PE in school).

What the ????

Why not make the kids take PE before you start dictating what a parent puts in a kid's lunchbox? When I was in school, PE was never optional.

Amazing.

Posted by: Cass at October 23, 2008 01:42 PM

The only group we're really allowed to intentionally discriminate against...on a statistical or public policy sense is white males.

And us males are in the *minority*, too.

5.3 million more ladies than gents in the US and I *still* can't get a date.

The irony just writes itself...

Posted by: BillT at October 23, 2008 02:23 PM

You should get a dog, Bill. I have a dog, and I am pretty sure that he likes me.

Posted by: spd rdr at October 23, 2008 02:35 PM

But on an individual level I've seen that even people who believe in the most pernicious stereotypes seem quite able to set them aside when they encounter an individual who clearly doesn't 'fit the pattern'. And we deal with human beings as individuals, not as groups.

Something I NEVER knew until after my grandfather was dead for several years was that, apparently he was VERY racist. My parents had made it crystal clear to him that they did not approve and he was not to... 'impose' is the wrong word (I don't know what is appropriate)... those beliefs onto their children. Thus, I never knew. But from what I've been told since then, as racist as he was, he never knew a single black person he did not like (and yes, he did know some). It was, as you point out, the 'idea' of blacks that he didn't like, but individuals he liked just fine.

And I will point out, this is a man born, bred and raised in New Hampshire... NOT the deep South. There goes another stereotype.

Posted by: MikeD at October 23, 2008 02:57 PM

"Thus, I never knew. But from what I've been told since then, as racist as he was, he never knew a single black person he did not like (and yes, he did know some). It was, as you point out, the 'idea' of blacks that he didn't like, but individuals he liked just fine."

My Grandfather was exactly like that. This was in the 60's and 70's. He was always railing about them. But he knew a bunch of them (we're in NE N. Carolina) and did anything in the world for them. That must have been a complicated time when he lived.

Posted by: lutonmoore at October 23, 2008 08:59 PM

spd -- got four dogs, and they miss me.

Mike -- I heard the following from one of my Guard buds during a backyard barbecue at my house, many years ago: "Now, you take Conservatives -- they don't like us *as a group* but they're true friends when they know you as an individual. Now, take Liberals -- they like us as a *group*, but are scared sh*tless to get to know us as individuals. Got another beer in that cooler, Bill?"

Posted by: BillT at October 24, 2008 10:33 AM

In the research I have done about nutrition and corporations, the more highly processed the food is, the more you will find lobbyists and researchers from said corporations who need to sell product, so it is marketed as having some benefit.

I have been doing food storage and living off of it for over 18 years. We bake whole grain breads that are comparable to what you will pay 7-10 dollars a loaf for at an upscale bakery. We make our own sausage and other delights. we have some fresh herbs and sprouts. That said, the children have a far better diet at home than they would in the school cafeteria or in an eatery.

It took a heavy investment of time and money to get to this point, good equipment doesn't come cheap, even if you do get it second-hand. However, the trade-off is healthier children and
meaningful work.

HOWEVER, that doesn't mean that Dr. Pepper and Snicker's bars haven't crossed the threshold of Chez Engineer.

PMS nutrition, folks. It has replaced the Midol drip.

Posted by: Cricket at October 24, 2008 11:26 AM

Did somebody say "healthier chicken"? Watch out for Chinese chicken with menanine in it. A killer right there.

Posted by: Ymarsakar at October 24, 2008 10:33 PM

Rope. Tree. Ayers and Dorhn.

Some assembly required.

Posted by: Red and Blue together at October 25, 2008 05:23 PM

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