« Department of Flogging Deceased Equine Flesh | Main | Creepy Christmas Gift Thread »

November 19, 2008

Wake Me When This Is Over

Incroyable...

Just when you thought there was no problem so trivial that pandering Washington politicians couldn't come along and try to make it worse:

Barack Obama has revealed his first major policy initiative: college football reform. In Obama's first televised interview since winning the presidency, he explained what's wrong with the current system, in which computers help determine the two teams that play for the national championship. "I think any sensible person would say that if you've got a bunch of teams who play throughout the season, and many of them have one loss or two losses—there's no clear decisive winner—that we should be creating a playoff system," Obama said. "I don't know any serious fan of college football who has disagreed with me on this. So, I'm gonna throw my weight around a little bit. I think it's the right thing to do."

If ever there were a venue that was overdue for federal government intervention, it has got to be college football.

Because Lord knows the federal government has such a stellar track record with solving other intractable problems. Gnat, meet sledgehammer.

Posted by Cassandra at November 19, 2008 10:05 AM

Trackback Pings

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.villainouscompany.com/mt/mt-tb.cgi/2543

Comments

> Gnat, meet sledgehammer.

Well, of course. If you started using a full-auto machine gun on cockroaches, the politicians might get shot by accident.

Posted by: OBloodyhell at November 19, 2008 12:19 PM

As the French say, "incroyable". If there's one place where the government shouldn't go mucking around, this is it. Evidently there aren't any real pressing problems to attract his attention.

We have an interesting four years ahead, if this is any indication of Obama's management style: "So, I'm gonna throw my weight around a little bit. I think it's the right thing to do."

For some odd reason, the scene from the Monty Python movie "Life of Brian" [?] pops up - the scene where the people all shout "Yes! Tell us what to think!"

Posted by: ZZMike at November 19, 2008 12:23 PM

Either that or, "How may we f- off, O Lord???" :p

That has to be one of my all time favorites.

Posted by: Cassandra at November 19, 2008 12:26 PM

Heh. "F- off, O One" may be the response he gets...

Posted by: BillT at November 19, 2008 12:51 PM

Full disclosure:
I agree with President-Elect Obama's analysis of the situation in NCAA Football. They need a playoff series, but the BCS does not want to lose it's money or prestige and has shown zero interest in going to a playoff series.

Now, as for my statement. He's an idiot for even talking about this. For one thing, I'd have thought that of all the fish he has to fry, this one would be one of the last on his plate. Two, this is not a proper role for the Federal government to take, in fact his intervention is un-Constitutional (as per the Tenth Amendment). Three, even if this WERE a proper Federal governmental role... IT'S NOT IN HIS POWER TO DO ANYTHING ABOUT THIS!!! He's an Executive, not a Legislator. I really don't think he understands the difference, and that's why he looks so dumb on this.

As a Legislator, this kind of thing is routine. "Let's pass a meaningless resolution approving of corn as the national indigenous grain of the United States, and the farmers in Iowa will love it." or "We hereby declare February 30th to be National Intelligent Government Day." They do that crap because there's no political risk in it. Save from the informed electorate who decry the waste of their tax dollars on this stuff. Lucky for Legislatures, they're just one of hundreds of folks who approve that, so they can hide in the crowd.

If this ever actually hits the news (and I kind of suspect it'll get swept under the rug), he's going to find that the American people may like Change and Hope, but have little tolerance for wastes of time.

Posted by: MikeD at November 19, 2008 01:16 PM

I think that we should hold the championship on the White House lawn.

Posted by: Sans Helmet at November 19, 2008 02:02 PM

I also think that Barney Frank should be the game ball.

Posted by: Sans Helmet at November 19, 2008 02:04 PM

[sniff!]

Something tells me you people are not taking my suggestion seriously.

I am hurt. Deeply, deeply hurt. And so is Michelle.

Posted by: The One at November 19, 2008 02:08 PM

He doesn't know of any opposition to a playoff? Really? I Googled for about ten minutes and found, oh, ten pretty extensive article in opposition. There's no way he can be even a marginally-aware college football fan and not know there's serious opposition to the playoffs.

It's bad enough to want to flex his muscles where they dont' belong. It's worse to lie about it.

Posted by: Jimmie at November 19, 2008 02:32 PM

O, spare us, please!

Posted by: DougW at November 19, 2008 02:35 PM

In two days, every Vietnam Vet in the US will have heard the news.

I've been busy, I have, I have...

Posted by: BillT at November 19, 2008 03:00 PM

On the plus side, now Susan Sarandon can stop quivering with anticipation on what he plans to do...

Posted by: BillT at November 19, 2008 03:12 PM

Now the article calls this his "first major policy initiative". I know of no jurisdiction the gov't has over college football, nor do I see anything in the quotes of Obama that suggests this is part of the policies of his administration.

Of course, should pot and kettle forget: Rep. Joe L. Barton, Texas Republican, in 2005 called a BCS official before his subcommittee to review the system.

Or the whole baseball and steroids thing, which even made it into the 2004 State of the Union Address: "To help children make right choices, they need good examples. Athletics play such an important role in our society, but, unfortunately, some in professional sports are not setting much of an example. The use of performance enhancing drugs like steroids in baseball, football, and other sports is dangerous, and it sends the wrong message: that there are shortcuts to accomplishment, and that performance is more important than character. So tonight I call on team owners, union representatives, coaches, and players to take the lead, to send the right signal, to get tough, and to get rid of steroids now."

Sen. John McCain called baseball's current steroid policy a "joke," threatened to introduce drug-testing legislation, and reported that President Bush was thrilled by the prospect. "There's not a doubt in my mind. He'd love to," McCain said. "The president is very concerned." Democrat Sen. Nancy Pelosi concurred.

So I thought the Conservative ideals in general would be against something like imposing drug-testing legislation on your union or business, or of course messing with the BCS? Now if its outside of the context of government (no legislation is involved, its not an 'official' affair), then I see no problem with him offering an opinion.

That same CBS interview says that Obama's first legislative goal is an economic stimulus bill, and that his first Presidential actions will be taken through reviews and modifications of Executive Orders. BCS as a "policy initiative"? Please; that's a distortion.

BTW, greetings OBH. I didn't know you were on this site. I take my handle from you and my favorite label you have for me.

Posted by: libtard at November 19, 2008 03:17 PM

I'm against changing the current BCS system for three reasons.

One, I hate change, any change. Change sucks. Name the last time that something changed and you liked it. Daylight savings time? It sucks. New Coke? Sucked. Designated hitter? Vortex to hell. The Car of Tomorrow? Hoover City. Katie Couric? Not even light can escape such yawning suckitude.

Two, any change to the current BCS model would result in there being nothing to argue about about between the World Series and the Final Four. And that means hockey.

Nope. No change. EVER.

Posted by: spd rdr at November 19, 2008 03:33 PM

Three, changing anything other than your oil may jeapordizee your happy marriage.
(Bet you thought that I forgot.)

Posted by: spd rdr at November 19, 2008 03:34 PM

*sigh*

Slate is hardly a conservative rag, lib :p Didn't watch the 60 minutes piece, not going to defend Slate.

Be that as it may, regardless of who broaches the idea of interfering in pro sports, I think it's stupid for government to get involved... as I believe I said last time this cockamamie idea came up :p

Posted by: Cassandra at November 19, 2008 03:35 PM

Sorry... that should have been pro or college sports! That'll teach me to type while I'm on the phone.

Posted by: Cassandra at November 19, 2008 03:37 PM

Personally, I've castigated politicians regardless of political stripe for wasting our time on trivial BS like this and baseball and such. I make MINOR exceptions for the President to meet with Cub Scout troop 472 for 10 minutes in the Oval Office, but that's pushing it. I frankly don't care WHO in the Federal government is wasting the taxpayers time with this crap, I dislike all of it. I am not holding President-Elect Obama to any more or less stringent standards than any other Federal level elected official.

Now, mind you... I was corrected on the baseball issue. Again, full disclosure: steroid use is bad, and I believe steroid use is an epidemic in Major League Baseball. My personal opinion is you should treat it like every other drug use infraction, call the police. Let big name ball players face the same court system the unknown kid off the street does. HOWEVER, a friend of mine DID point out that since Congress has given Major League Baseball an exemption to Anti-Trust laws (which I also believe should be removed, what real purpose does that serve?), they have a measure of control over MLB. That said, HAVING that measure of control, and exercising it are two different things. They SHOULDN'T have that control, and even if they do, it's still a waste of time to exercise it.

But what do I know, I just pay the salaries of those fools on Capitol Hill.

Posted by: MikeD at November 19, 2008 03:40 PM

Here we see the usual attitude of the Statists. They notice something occurs that they don't supervise. Something no bureau directs. Something other people run. It must be eradicated.

Obama may be a fan. Or not.

He could probably do a better job than the BCS does. But that doesn't matter. The reason it must change is that he has power and wants it changed.

Posted by: K at November 19, 2008 04:13 PM

"I'm gonna throw my weight around a little bit. I think it's the right thing to do."

Good nightshirt, lib. If you don't think that when the President of these United States says "I'm going to throw my weight around", he's talking about setting administration policy, you need a serious reality check.

That's right up there with "Who will rid me of this turbulent priest?" :p

And if Barack Obama is so naive that he still thinks he can go on 60 Minutes and say things like that and people will think he's "kidding", he needs to be disabused of that notion. He's in the big leagues now. This isn't the Illinois Senate. It's a serious job.

Posted by: Cassandra at November 19, 2008 04:39 PM

On the otter heiny, the idea that we're not *really* supposed to take Senator Obama seriously when he says he's "going to throw his weight around" has its amusing aspects.

Posted by: Cassandra at November 19, 2008 04:41 PM

I was nodding my head to everything in spd rdr's list of bad changes until I got to:

Designated hitter? Vortex to hell.

I like the designated hitter rule. (Although I have to admit that watching pitchers try to bat is always good for a laugh.)

I have to agree with Mr. Libtard that I'm often puzzled by the amount of time and money Congress spends on sports issues. However this:

Rep. Joe L. Barton, Texas Republican, in 2005 called a BCS official before his subcommittee to review the system.

is not a sports issue. Mr. Barton is from Texas; for him, college football is a religious issue.

Posted by: Elise at November 19, 2008 04:53 PM

I like the designated hitter rule. (Although I have to admit that watching pitchers try to bat is always good for a laugh.)

My dearest Elise, although I wholly appreciate your popular sentiments regarding the *&^%$# designated hitter rule, I think that I would be remiss if I did not alert you to the following historical information obtained Wikipedia (so you absolutely know that it must be at least truthy).

On April 6, 1973, Ron Blomberg of the New York Yankees became the first designated hitter in Major League Baseball history, facing Boston Red Sox right-handed pitcher Luis Tiant in his first plate appearance. "Boomer" Blomberg was walked.

Naturally, the result of the first season of the DH was that the American League posted a higher batting average than the National League, something which has remained consistent to this day.

Ignore the fact that it was a child-consuming Grendel Yankees batter that came up against a patriotic, gallant, and handsome Red Sox pitcher. The facts speak for themselves, and when the facts are just dumb, they hire me to speak for them as their legal counsel. Please remember that our single, guiding principle has always been to restore balance to the Universe by conferring upon this particular physical endeavor,such tax breaks and antitrust exemptions as to allow this form of casual "entertainment" to flourish amongst and between the several states without the risk of unwarranted federal interference, and to bring glory to that pastime that has meant so much to America as this great country has grown and prospered, and to, possibly, convert major League Baseball into a bank holding company so that it can tap into the unlimited reserves of taxpayer bailouts.


That major league baseball is deserving of government loans to continue its consumer-oriented practices of producing high-quality entertainment at the lowest possible price per hit, needs no further proof. Failing logic, however, I will remind you that in Hell there is only t-ball, and the Yankees are to big fail.

Call me a fundamnmentalist

Posted by: spd rdr at November 19, 2008 07:08 PM

I gotta say I'm with Cass on the "Policy/thrown weight" issue. It's one thing to say: "I think it's stupid and the NCAA ought to abandon the BCS for playoffs". But when you say "I'm gonna throw my weight around" you are making the statement that you are going to be active in working to affect that goal. Whether you call it a personal preference backed by the weight of being POTUS or Administration Policy is a distinction without a difference.

I do, however, agree that the federal gov't (or the state gov't for that matter) oughta keep their bloody noses out of it. McCain's involvement in the whole MLB/Steroid deal is one of the reasons I didn't like him: It's nunya bidness.

You have probable cause to believe that Bonds is purchasing, possessing, and/or using illegal substances?

Fine.

Go get a warrant and arrest him. It won't matter one damn bit what the policies of the MLB, NFL, NBA, NCAA, etc. are if the offender is in jail. That's what would happen to me, why should Bonds be any better?

Posted by: Yu-Ain Gonnano at November 19, 2008 07:17 PM

Dear God, woman.

Tell me that you did *not* just encourage spd to wax rhapsodic about baseball???? That is like waving crack cocaine in front of ... well... me :p

ARE YOU MAD? Next thing you know he'll be blathering on about the infield fly rule and I will have to school him, old style.

Posted by: Marion Barry at November 19, 2008 07:23 PM

Dear Former Mayor Barry:

No matter what the rules, your team still sucks.

Warmest regards,

spd

Posted by: spd rdr at November 19, 2008 08:42 PM

Huh? My team sox???

Oh, you said rocks.

Understandably so. Carry on.

Posted by: Marion Barry at November 19, 2008 09:25 PM

The DH and the infield fly rule are of the devil.


You know what...let President-elect Obama muddle in the affairs of college football. Maybe it will distract him and the rest of us can go on living our lives without the worry of Big Brother getting involved.


Wishful thinking, eh? A girl can dream...

Posted by: HomefrontSix at November 19, 2008 09:40 PM

Since we've been talking about Republican Branding and RINOs lately, I should point out (before running away), that this is exactly the kind of thing that causes that epithet to be spat out: How, exactly, do you consider regulating college and pro sports a part of 'limited government'?

Posted by: Yu-Ain Gonnano at November 19, 2008 10:31 PM

That major league baseball is deserving of government loans to continue its consumer-oriented practices...

Geez, baseball is still around? I remember playing that when I was a *kid*...

Posted by: BillT at November 20, 2008 02:27 AM

I want to ban the infield fly rule. Government needs to understand how it marginalizes everyone by its existence. My platform will address the consequences of it and will introduce legislation to protect everyone from its effects.

Posted by: The Big O at November 20, 2008 09:41 AM

If you ban the infield fly rule, the outfield will have a superfluity of flies. This will in turn upset the balance of nature -- flycatchers, bats and frogs will no longer be able to find food in the infield, and will be in heightened competition for those flies concentrated in the outfield, resulting in increased stress on individuals, and indeed, entire species, leading inexorably to mass extinctions on a scale unsurpassed since the Cambrian catastr

What?

Posted by: BillT at November 20, 2008 10:01 AM

You're just a fly in the ointment, Bill.

Posted by: HomefrontSix at November 20, 2008 12:27 PM

Ignore the fact that it was a child-consuming Grendel Yankees batter that came up against a patriotic, gallant, and handsome Red Sox pitcher.

Would that be the same patriotic, gallant, and handsome pitcher who left the Red Sox in 1978, joined the child-consuming Grendel Yankees in 1979, and promptly made a Ball Park Franks hot dog commercial which featured the tag-line, "It's good to be with a wiener"? Hmm?

I vote "Present" on the infield fly rule. (Sorry, Mayor, but it's my week to be fuel-on-fire-ish.)

Posted by: Elise at November 20, 2008 12:42 PM

You're just a fly in the ointment, Bill.

No, I'm a-fly inna the helicopter. Sheesh.

Posted by: BillT at November 20, 2008 01:53 PM

"No, I'm a-fly inna the helicopter.

Given the fact that it takes both hands and both feet to keep a fling-wing-ed, whirly bird in the air........
Inquiring minds want to know: With what appendage are you pokin' the keyboard?

Posted by: McGruff at November 20, 2008 02:09 PM

You bet Obama is going to "throw his weight" around.

ARE YOU MAD? Next thing you know he'll be blathering on about the infield fly rule and I will have to school him, old style.

That'd be interesting to see.

On the plus side, now Susan Sarandon can stop quivering with anticipation on what he plans to do...

To her or for her?

Posted by: Ymarsakar at November 20, 2008 03:15 PM

You're just a fly in the ointment, Bill.

Ghost in the Machine is Bill here.

Posted by: Ymarsakar at November 20, 2008 03:16 PM

With what appendage are you pokin' the keyboard?

I keep *tellin'* ya and *tellin'* ya -- there's a *reason* for the 27-inch zipper on the flight suit.

Geez.

Posted by: BillT at November 21, 2008 06:15 AM

To her or for her?

You just *had* to bring sex and relationships into it...

Posted by: BillT at November 21, 2008 06:17 AM

So which foot or hand operates the control that beats the air into submission Bill? Not that's I'm tryin to change the subject or anything, not little ole me. *looks innocent*

Posted by: MikeD at November 21, 2008 10:27 AM

A foul canard, spread by jealous louts in the starched-wing community.

Helicopters just vibrate so much and are so noisy that the earth rejects them.

Posted by: BillT at November 21, 2008 11:04 AM

Cass said: "And if Barack Obama is so naive that he still thinks he can go on 60 Minutes and say things like that and people will think he's "kidding", he needs to be disabused of that notion."

and Cass said: "...Didn't watch the 60 minutes piece..."

Well now, perhaps that's a bit telling? The transcripts and video are out there to look at. The starting page is here: http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2008/11/16/60minutes/main4607893.shtml __ You will find the comment in question in the third section called "Obamas On Picking The Presidential Pooch" (gee, that really sounds 'policy-like'). It comes after Mr.Kroft has finished discussing the new dog and Michelle Obama's mother. Right where you would expect 'policy matters'...

Cass said: "If you don't think that when the President of these United States says "I'm going to throw my weight around", he's talking about setting administration policy, you need a serious reality check."

You mean kind of like if the POTUS went to the G8 summit and told Gordon Brown and Nicolas Sarkozy on leaving: "Goodbye from the world's biggest polluter!" and then punched the air and smiled?

You guys will have plenty of legitimate issues and concerns get mad about, however, I don't think this is one of them.

Posted by: libtard at November 25, 2008 12:15 PM

That's kind of a ridiculous example.

First of all, Bush is at the end of his second term. There is no legitimate doubt as to what his policy is, so taking an offhand remark made after the conference was over, in parting as a serious statement of what his policy was going to be, going forward makes absolutely no sense.

As I think you'll have to grant.

Obama, on the other hand, went on 60 Minutes precisely to answer questions about what his policy would be. We don't know yet, do we? Because he hasn't taken office yet, and unlike Bush being at the G8 at the end of his 2nd term, his sole purpose in being on TV was to address that uncertainty.

And his remark was made within the interview itself, not after it was done.

Big difference.

Posted by: Cassandra at November 25, 2008 12:23 PM

Post a comment

To reduce comment spam, comments on older posts are put into moderation 5 days after the last activity. Comments with more than one link also go into moderation. If you don't see your comment after posting it, try refreshing the screen. If you still don't see it, your comment is probably in the moderation queue.




Remember Me?

(you may use HTML tags for style)