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March 01, 2010

Public Service Announcement

The Editorial Staff interrupts our regularly scheduled blogging hiatus to direct you to John Hawkins' nifty new site.

Since we're on the topic anyway, feel free to contribute your favorite aphorism on self reliance in the comments section. I found this one amusing:

Isn't food important? Why not "universal food coverage"? If politicians and employers had guaranteed us "free" food 50 years ago, today Democrats would be wailing about the "food crisis" in America, and you'd be on the phone with your food care provider arguing about whether or not a Reuben sandwich with fries was covered under your plan.”

—Ann Coulter

Posted by Cassandra at March 1, 2010 07:44 AM

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Comments

What about alternative energy? If the environment is so important, why are all those alternatives so dang expensive? I want alternative energy insurance! This would allow me to build my own solar energy generated electrical company, and altruistically, share with my neighbors or send it back to the greedy power company.

Posted by: Cricket at March 1, 2010 08:53 AM

...and you'd be on the phone with your food care provider arguing about whether or not a Reuben sandwich with fries was covered under your plan.”

Of course it wouldn't. It's fat content is extraordinarily too high. And if you choose to go off plan and eat it anyway, we're going to have to deny coverage of any future heart, cholesterol, and diabetic or any other weight related healthcare.

Gotta keep those costs under control, yanno?

Posted by: Yu-Ain Gonnano at March 1, 2010 09:42 AM

The Kool Aide Has Turned To Poison, Will The Democrats Still Drink It?

http://bellalu0.wordpress.com/2010/03/01/the-koolaid-is-now-poison-will-the-democrats-drink-it/

Posted by: keyboard jockey at March 1, 2010 10:11 AM

Yay Cass! Ok, on topic, on topic...

Well, I actually thought of something similar to this yesterday:
"Of course it wouldn't. It's fat content is extraordinarily too high. And if you choose to go off plan and eat it anyway, we're going to have to deny coverage of any future heart, cholesterol, and diabetic or any other weight related healthcare."

On Law and Order, they had a case about assisted suicide, and I did learn something interesting. Technically, suicide is legal in New York (which surprised me), but there is a law specifically against helping someone else commit suicide. And that law is controversial. But one of the points made in the (admittedly fake) case is that "the government cannot tell you what you can put in your own body... rights of privacy... etc". Well, first off, that's not true. The government frequently tells you what you cannot put in your own body (drugs, for example). But there is a disturbing trend where the government wants to tell you not to eat things that are BAD for you. NYC's ban on transfats for example.

Technically, you can legally consume transfats in NYC, you just can't sell them. But how long until that changes. At what point will the busybodies raid your fridge for butter and Cheetos (and no, I don't keep Cheetos in the fridge)? So it's funny now to joke about the fat content in a reuben (one of the greatest sandwiches ever made in my opinion), but the day may come where you won't be allowed to purchase one (or perhaps even eat it). And we'll have our political class to thank for that.

What fun.

Posted by: MikeD at March 1, 2010 10:44 AM

Local quote from when I was in Norway:

People would rather have time off from work to go to the chiropractor once a month than do the exercises he tells them to do so that they don't have to go.

Posted by: tomg51 at March 1, 2010 01:09 PM

...and you'd be on the phone with your food care provider arguing about whether or not a Reuben sandwich with fries was covered under your plan.”

Food stamps are accepted at a nearby pizza shop where they make custom pizzas, doing everything but cooking them. I doubt that this shop is unique.

No wonder there's a black market in food stamps (cf. the sitcom "Everybody Hates Chris").

Posted by: James Drake at March 1, 2010 02:30 PM

James, when I was first married my husband was a sophomore in college and we had a baby and no money.

I was shocked to see women down at the grocery store using food stamps and WIC coupons to buy things that we couldn't afford (we were well below the poverty level for a family of three). I bought fresh food - couldn't afford frozen or prepared foods. It really frosted my corn flakes to see these folks buying expensive junk foods with taxpayer funds.

Posted by: Cassandra at March 1, 2010 04:50 PM

You can have either the freedom to earn your bread by the sweat of your brow, or shed your sweat as a slave of the state.
It is either Liberty or Tyranny.
By the way: the state does not feed very well. Consult the citizens of North Korea for details.

Posted by: mathman at March 1, 2010 06:10 PM

Ann Coulter. Sandwich analogies.

I'm sorry, Mr. Buckley, but, apparently, we're doomed.

Posted by: Edito Ratlarge at March 1, 2010 06:34 PM

Ms. Coulter,

We currently have “universal food coverage.” It’s called food stamps and/or WIC. And nobody claims that it’s “free.” It is paid for by taxes on those of us that can afford food.

And I guess junk food sales will be through the roof this year since the number of Americans receiving food stamps continues to break all-time records.

Hey, there's a self-help tip in that statement:

"Invest in Frito-Lay!"

(I guess I should say PepsiCo, since they own Frito-Lay.)

And invest in a Papa Murphy's Take and Bake Pizza franchise, too, since I believe that's the pizza shop James is referring to. Their target market is booming right now.

In fact, here's a press release from Papa Murphy's website:

"Amidst one of the toughest years the restaurant industry has ever endured, Papa Murphy's International today announced that its total U.S. systemwide sales grew to $630 million in 2009, up over 7% from 2008. The take ‘n' bake pizza pioneer ended the year with 1,185 locations, opening 83 in 2009. Same-store-sales were up more than 2%, while most industry watchers estimated the pizza category to be down about 7%."

Posted by: Craig at March 1, 2010 10:22 PM

Mmm...a Reuben sandwich. ~( 8^(|)

Posted by: camojack at March 2, 2010 01:13 AM

And I guess junk food sales will be through the roof this year since the number of Americans receiving food stamps continues to break all-time records.

Yes, the number of military families on food stamps is up too, despite the fact that military pay has not changed one bit (other than to *increase*). Draw what conclusions you will from that :p

I've always found that amusing. We made less money (even in inflation adjusted dollars) than the lowest enlisted rank for the first two years we were married and we never even got close to asking for food stamps. I even saved part of every paycheck.

Every month I planned a whole month's menus in advance. You'd be surprised how much money you can save by just planning ahead (something, by the way, that has always been anathema to me). But if there is a need, you do what you have to do.

I have no problem with programs like that as a safety net but the problem with them is that that is not the way they are used.

Posted by: Cassandra at March 2, 2010 09:01 AM

Hi Cass,

Take this with a grain of salt.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZhT5ZNyHlM

Posted by: Mark McGilvray at March 2, 2010 12:45 PM

Mark, John Hawkins has generously supported my writing from the very beginning so when he asked for help promoting his new site there was no way I was going to refuse.

Whatever faults I may have, I try to pay my debts. Funny song, though. Touche.

Posted by: Cassandra at March 2, 2010 01:08 PM

Cass, we love you. Take a break and come back.

Posted by: Mark McGilvray at March 2, 2010 01:45 PM

We had a fabulous rotisserie chicken a couple of weeks ago. Half the bird was left over, so we picked the meat off and put it in a casserole. The carcass and skin were given to the cats.
Normally I would have made chicken broth out of it, but every now and then we give them table scraps. It was almost spooky, the way they were lined up at the door...heh.

Last night, I took the bone out of the home-cured buckboard bacon. It was used to make yellow split pea soup.

Life is good. Soup is truly an amazing food. Easy to do and so comforting on a bone-chilling cold day. The cats are inside, basking in the warmth.

Posted by: Cricket at March 2, 2010 03:46 PM

My wife and I were married just before my senior year in undergraduate school. We didn't go on food stamps - she was a substitute teacher and I had some hours as a grocery clerk. But we did qualify for surplus food, picking up some cheese and peanut butter and ... I forget what else. Pasta, IIRC.

Of course, while I was a grocery clerk I handled OTHER people's food stamps. Some bought basic staples, some bought frozen pizzas.

Posted by: RonF at March 2, 2010 03:57 PM

A country where people are dependent on the government is not populated by citizens. It is populated by subjects.

Posted by: RonF at March 2, 2010 03:58 PM

"Con la boca adorando y con el mano dando." Praying devoutly while hammering stoutly (aka G-d helps those who help themselves.)

Posted by: LittleRed1 at March 2, 2010 06:17 PM

Hey, guys and gals, let's get ready to RUMBLE!!!!!
Ok... Then how about we just have a nice chat about literary characters? You see, it appears that some chaps and chapettes from our cousins across the Big Pond have decided to list their 100 'favourite' literary characters, to which I must take a most vigourous American exception.
There's Yossarian, of course (YES!), but not Huck Finn? Moby Dick appears (in a non-speaking role), but not the voluable Ignatious J. Reilly? Does Hannible Lecter's inhuman inhumanness really outdo the immortal, hypnotic, and debonaire Count Dracula? Why choose Joseph K, a complete schlump in the gears of a legal system he could not understand rather than Aticus Finch who took another legal system to school? And where's Ivan Ivanovich playing pinnochle with John Galt? I've no doubt that James Bond is very cool, but think of how cool Walter Mitty could have been if he'd only had Q. Oh yeah, I'm just getting warmed up.

So, anyway, as long as our hostess is recharging, I'd figured that I'd annoy you a while longer (trust me, the longer this lasts, the happier you'll be when Cass returns and I'm relegated to mixing metaphors under the sink).

What literary character do you think is missing from this list, and why? Of course, if he or she is good enough, you won't have to say why, we'll know why.

Have at it boys and girls.

Posted by: spd-o-rahma-lahma-ding-dong at March 2, 2010 08:14 PM

A pound of Momma is worth a ton of priest.

(relates to moral guidance; it is better to raise up a child and give him/her a moral worldview as opposed to wait for that child to become an adult, and need a priest to give him/her that moral worldview).

Posted by: Geekasaurus at March 2, 2010 08:38 PM

Jack Ryan.
Mammy.
Melanie Wilkes.
Uh...are these supposed to be American novels?

My son and daughter are dancing around the kitchen; she is singing 'I'm a Barbie girl in a Barbie world; life of plastic/it's fantastic.' They are taking turns leading.

She switched gears. Now she is doing her Elvis Presley impersonation: Elvis sings 'Music of the Night' from the 'Phantom of the Opry.'

Posted by: Cricket at March 2, 2010 09:16 PM

What literary character do you think is missing from this list, and why?

There were so many missing that it's hard to know where to start.

1. "Jo" from Little Women. In fact, now that I think of it, Jo, Beth, Amy and Meg. And Mrs. March. Between the girls and their mother, Louisa May Alcott pretty much cornered the market on "How to be a good woman" for me.

I must have read that series at least 10 times when I was a girl.

2. O-Lan from The Good Earth. Patient, kind, strong, resourceful in bad times and possessed of a stubborn, quiet courage that never flagged no matter how bleak life became for her. She took the pittance life dealt her and created abundance for those she loved.

3. Piggy from Lord of the Flies. He embodies everything we think of as evolved/civilized in a savage world where reason and morality must be balanced with the other side of human nature.

4. Hank Reardon and Wesley Mouch from Atlas Shrugged. Hank is a less heroic but more interesting figure to me that John Galt (who was pretty one-dimensional). Wesley Mouch is the embodiment of evil masquerading as charity.

Just a few to start you off.

Posted by: Cassandra at March 3, 2010 07:53 AM

Alyosha and Ivan Karamazov: a study in contrasts between the human need to believe in some larger purpose and the seductive and perverse comfort of cynicism.

Posted by: Cassandra at March 3, 2010 08:06 AM

Anna Karenina: object lesson on the foolishness of being ruled by one's passions.

Posted by: Cassandra at March 3, 2010 08:07 AM

I loved 'Little Women' too. My daughter saw the movie (the 1995 release) and just loved it. She has been tearing the house apart looking for my copy of the book. I have one, but it is in sad shape, so she is getting a brand new copy of the series for her birthday.

Laura Ingalls Wilder. 'Little House on the Prairie' series.

A vintage book; Gene Stratton-Porter's 'Laddie, A True Blue Story'. The character of Little Sister.
Also her 'Girl of the Limberlost.' Elnora Comstock is fabulous.

Tom D. Fitzgerald of 'The Great Brain.' 'Huff said.

Posted by: Cricket at March 3, 2010 08:38 AM

FWIW, Little Men was pretty good too. Not many people have read it. If you don't have a copy, she might enjoy it.

Posted by: Cassandra at March 3, 2010 09:01 AM

Kristen Lavransdattur. One of the great classics of medieval fiction. What we do in youth echoes in middle and old age :p

Posted by: Cassandra at March 3, 2010 09:03 AM

Nicholas de Fleury of the Niccolo Rising series by Dorothy Dunnett. One of the most fascinating and complex characters I've ever encountered.

If you've never read Dunnett, you're missing something extraordinary.

Posted by: Cassandra at March 3, 2010 09:11 AM

Personally I like the characters in the entire "Brotherhood of War" series. Some interesting character studies and melding of numerous real world Army officer-types.

My wife's dad served with a lot of those people, and clearly recognized the people from descriptions.

Also, WEB Griffin's series on the Corps is pretty good too, although sometimes it seemed to stretch credulity.

As for classic American literary character icons, any list that fails to include Tom Sawyer, Huck Finn and General Frank Savage is short on American ideas and ideals.

Posted by: kbob in Katy (in Daytona for the week!) at March 3, 2010 09:47 AM

How about the Three Musketeers?

Percy Blakeney in The Scarlet Pimpernel (HUGE childhood hero of mine)

Buck, in The Call of the Wild

Posted by: Cassandra at March 3, 2010 10:48 AM

It seems that many of my favorite literary characters are arguing (in my head) for inclusion. LeCarre's George Smiley makes a good point that he is delightfully flawed, yet brilliant spy-master, and the niftiest of older gentlemen. "Kat" Katczinsky from "All Quiet on the Western Front" reminds me that, without his maturity, strength, and resourcefulness, the protagonist would not have survived long enough to glimpse the butterfly. Judah Ben-Hur just laid the smack-down on that spoiled brat Holden Caufield for staring at Blanche Dubois, much to the bemusment of Tom Joad and Willie Stark who sit sharing a beer at the bar, tended by none other than that old rascal Frank Skeffington. And look who just walked in! Cyrano, my old friend, pull up a stool!
I'd wish the'd hold it down a bit, though. It's tough to get any work down with all that racket.

Posted by: spd-o-rahma-lahma-ding-dong at March 3, 2010 10:52 AM

I didn't think of George Smiley, but he is one of my all time favorites. I just watched the entire Le Carre series on DVD again a few weeks ago.

Bernard Sampson is another good one.

I did think of Cyrano :)

Posted by: Cassandra at March 3, 2010 11:44 AM

Yanno, when it comes right down to it, I think that Cyrano just cleared the room. Thrust home!

Posted by: spd-o-rahma-lahma-ding-dong at March 3, 2010 12:01 PM

I'm waiting for the Diva to dive.

Posted by: Mark McGilvray at March 3, 2010 01:37 PM

There's Kal El, who's too polite to call attention to himself, but whose very existence reminds us of why the world loves and envies America; there's The Mighty Thor and his brother Loki, who proved that the way to a twelve-year-old boy's heart is through the classic themes of literature; and there's Spiderman, who taught an entire generation of Americans that power is one thing; power properly applied is another.

Posted by: Valerie at March 3, 2010 01:46 PM

On self-sufficiency:

Taxes are not levied for the benefit of the taxed.
R. Heinlein

Posted by: valerie at March 3, 2010 01:53 PM

Anna Karennina? Good grief woman, are you going to do the Texas Chainsaw Massacre on me? Nah....never happen..right?

Posted by: Mark McGilvray at March 3, 2010 02:28 PM

Lessa from the Dragonriders series by Ann McCaffrey - flawed, vengeful, but a good role model for a budding nerdess.
Simon Tregarth from the Witchworld - how to you build a new life using only the skills from your old one? [a recurring theme in Norton's work]
Sherlock Holmes. Moby Dick. Will Stanton from Susan Cooper's "The Dark is Rising" series, because he is the only one who remembers, in the end.

As I think about it, it's amazing how many of the "great novels" I've not read. Histories, science books, poetry, sci-fi and fantasy, but not much literature. Hunh. Interesting.

Posted by: LittleRed1 at March 3, 2010 06:14 PM

It's nice that your back--however briefly!!

Posted by: philip at March 3, 2010 06:59 PM

I've been patiently awaiting for a certain someone to mention Captain Augustus McCrea, late of the Texas Rangers, now partnerin' with fellow Ranger Woodrow Call in the Hat Creek Creek Cattle company.

So I got impatient, instead.

Posted by: spd-o-rahma-lahma-ding-dong at March 3, 2010 07:17 PM

That would be "Lonesome Dove" by Larry McMurtry, and perhaps you are waiting for ....Senor Pile Juan??

I have to say that one of my favorite "literary characters" is Beowulf Shafer, a character from Larry Niven's short stories, such as "Tales of Known Space". Mainly because he has so many incredible adventures (in the future) that I would like to have, not because Larry Niven's stories are great literature.
Just fun.

Posted by: Don Brouhaha at March 3, 2010 08:17 PM

Lazarus Long

Hilda

Mike Harmon (aka Kildare)

Miles Vorkosigan

Brun (aka Bubbles)

Am I the only one to notice a conspicuous lack of sci-fi works in that list?

Posted by: Rex at March 3, 2010 08:20 PM

Lwoksana Troi (Counselor Troi's mother) a female version of Falstaff.

Rex, we noticed. Some people think that science fiction is a genre, and not literature.

Posted by: Valerie at March 3, 2010 08:57 PM

I haven't read a lot of scienc fiction in recent memory. Probably because I so thoroughly gorged myself on it as a young adult. But as far as memorable characters are concerned, science fiction has produced as list as long as my own windedness. Truth be told, earlier today I was musing over whether Guy Montag, the "fireman" in Ray Bradbury's Farenheit 451 would qualify as one of my favorites. The fact that I even remembered his name some 30 years after last reading the story answered that question. (Bradbury opened a lot of new and difficult doors to me as a pre-teen. God bless my mother.)

Posted by: spd rdr at March 3, 2010 10:16 PM

I haven't read a lot of scienc fiction in recent memory. Probably because I so thoroughly gorged myself on it as a young adult. But as far as memorable characters are concerned, science fiction has produced as list as long as my own windedness. Truth be told, earlier today I was musing over whether Guy Montag, the "fireman" in Ray Bradbury's Farenheit 451 would qualify as one of my favorites. The fact that I even remembered his name some 30 years after last reading the story answered that question. (Bradbury opened a lot of new and difficult doors to me as a pre-teen. God bless my mother.)

Posted by: spd rdr at March 3, 2010 10:16 PM

Admittedly, I haven't read a lot of science fiction in recent years, although I gorged myself on it as a young adult. Truth be told, earlier today I was musing over whether Guy Montag, the "fireman" in Ray Bradbury's Farenheit 451 would qualify as one of my favorites. The fact that I even remembered his name some 30 years after last reading the story answered that question. (Bradbury opened a lot of new and difficult doors to me as a pre-teen. God bless my mother.)

Posted by: spd rdr at March 3, 2010 10:23 PM

Check it out! I'm triplets!

Posted by: spd rdr at March 3, 2010 10:24 PM

Nah. You're just three times as important as the rest of us...

*running for the barricades before I get swatted* :)

Posted by: Cassandra at March 3, 2010 10:41 PM

I have "Little Men" and "Jo's Boys." Excellent.
We did read 'The Scarlet Pimpernel' way back when.
The original film version of it starred the late Leslie Howard (Ashley Wilkes) and Merle Oberon.
Fantastic and much better than the tacky remake with Jane Seymour.

"The Man in the Iron Mask"
Jean Valjean...I have referred to his character often, of late.

The Hunchback.

Angelique de Sance de Monteloupe. Those who know, know. After reading that series, it got me
started reading about European history.

Roland and Oliver; the paladins of Charlemagne.
Ivanhoe
Pecos Bill

Posted by: Cricket at March 4, 2010 09:07 AM

King Kelson
Killashandra Rhee (Crystal Singer Series)
Helva from 'The Ship Who Sang'
All of the brains who ran the brainships and their brawns in the brainships series. I loved
Dragonriders; Lessa and Moreta.

Posted by: Cricket at March 4, 2010 09:10 AM

We have food stamps just like we've got Medicaid. We've even got farm subsidies, the FDA and Crop-dusters for Terrorists.

But the feds still don't run every restaurant, grocery store, vending machine, processing plant and fruit stand in America. If they did, we'd all be starving.

Posted by: Noel at March 4, 2010 10:42 AM

I find your lack of faith in our Congressional Overlords disturbing, Noel. I hope you're not one of those unpatriotic, Obama questioning extremist types.

*snort*

Posted by: Cassandra at March 4, 2010 11:02 AM

Cricket:

Try this version of the Scarlet Pimpernel.

http://www.amazon.com/Scarlet-Pimpernel-Boxed-Set/dp/0767026128

While not completely faithful to the novel, Richard Grant makes a wonderful Percy and Elizabeth McGovern is quite good as Margerite. I also loved Martin Shaw as Chauvelin. I own this one and have watched most of the episodes more than ones. It is sort of Horatio Hornblower-esque - very good period pieces and complex enough to enjoy more than once.

Posted by: Cassandra at March 4, 2010 11:08 AM

more than ONCE.

*sigh*

Posted by: Cassandra at March 4, 2010 11:09 AM

I have lots of faith in our Congressional Overlords, Cassandra--the Continental Congress:

"Were we directed from Washington when to sow and when to reap, we should soon want bread." - Thomas Jefferson :)

Posted by: Noel at March 4, 2010 11:34 AM

Ivanhoe was a rock-n-roll-onstud machine.
Although, come to think of it, he did dress kind of funny.

How about Don Quixote? I'm really struggling with old DQ. I mean, like, I like him and all, like, but is he really, like a favorite? You have rather be stuck in an elevator for two hours with DQ or, say, Mrs. Marple? Tough choices life gives us.

Posted by: spd-o-rahma-lahma-ding-dong at March 4, 2010 07:43 PM

When I was just a rosy cheeked (knock it off, JHD) Editorial Staff, my Dad used to talk about reading Don Quixote in college or HS.

I finally read it, and I have to say that tnhe character annoyed me. I really wanted to like him b/c my Dad did, but it didn't "take".

I think often when a character calls to us, that's a reflection of our being able to identify with them for some reason. Sometimes it's because we are like the character, sometimes the character reminds us of (or helps us understand) someone very important to us. But I think we have to have some connection. The truly great characters connect with many people because they either express some fundamental truth or because their story is one that is relevant to people who may be quite different.

One of the things I love about my Dad is that he was always a crusader of sorts. An idealist. I suppose I am too, but my idealism is different than his. At any rate, I will always feel affection for Don Quixote but he didn't bowl me over the way reading Moby Dick did (God help me).

Posted by: Cassandra at March 4, 2010 09:06 PM

Screwtape

Meg Murray (A Swiftly Tilting Planet, etc.)

Hercule Poirot

Jonas from The Giver

The Professor a.k.a Digory from The Narnia Chronicles

Aslan, too

Cassandra from Firebrand by Marion Zimmer Bradley

Shylock

Odysseus


Someone could earn a nice government grant to do a study on what these choices say about us...


Posted by: UinenMaia at March 4, 2010 09:40 PM

Well, I would vote for Miss Marple, but that would mean Murder on the Elevator Express...

DQ was okay. I finally clicked when reading about how he persisted in seeing the good in Aldonza (Dulcinea). He and Melanie Wilkes...she persisted in seeing something in Scarlett that
Scarlett really thought wasn't there until the very end.

Posted by: Cricket at March 4, 2010 09:46 PM

Someone could earn a nice government grant to do a study on what these choices say about us...

Wonderful choices :)

Posted by: Cassandra at March 4, 2010 10:02 PM

Unfortunately, we were forced to read "Les Misrables" (as I have remembered it for all these years) and "Green Mansions" aloud in my 9th grade English Lit class. Unfortunate, I say, because I was (literally) the only person in the class, except the teacher who COULD read!! Really pathetic and ruined both of those books for me.

Posted by: Oh Hell at March 4, 2010 10:26 PM

I forgot Nurse Ratchet. I think she was at NNMC last time they were in the process of reconstructing my innards.

Who knew gangrene could go there????

Posted by: kbob in katy at March 5, 2010 04:42 PM

"Unnamed", The Betrothed.

Dorothea, Middlemarch.

Mike (Michael?) The Moon is a Harsh Mistress.

Lizzie, Pride and Prejudice.

Mr. Rochester, Jane Eyre.


Food stamp comments reminds me of the local govt housing. Lots of late-model cars fancy cars in their lot. "Just can't figure it out..."

Posted by: Rebecca at March 5, 2010 05:30 PM

Captain Jack Aubrey
Herbert Stencil ("V")
Manuel Fidello ("Captains Courageous")
Long John Silver
Baloo
Tom Swift
Natty Bumpo
Holly Golightly

Posted by: spd-o-rahma-lahma-ding-dong at March 5, 2010 06:26 PM

I liked Screwtape. Now I really do need my head examined.

*goes off snorting and giggling*

Posted by: Cricket at March 6, 2010 08:52 AM

OT - if that is even possible in this thread - but I am reminded of numerous Texian patriots and the Battles of the Alamo and San Jacinto.

For some reason, a latin phrase keeps running around in my cranial cavity. One that I think would serve us well to remember:

Ubi libertas habitat ibi nostra patria est

I have been to all 50 (only 50 in my United States Mr. P-resident, as opposed to your 57), and all have a certain and special beauty. None however stir me like Texas.

I was not born in Texas, but I got here as quickly as I could. Being born in the Territory of Alaska, living in Texas is truly special. No where else does the spirit of freedom shine through so brightly.

May the light shine brightly in all places where men and women dream and strive for excellence. But above all, let us proclaim, in any laguage we speak:

Ubi libertas habitat ibi nostra patria est!

Thank you for your time.

Kp

Posted by: Kbob in Katy (home for the day!) at March 6, 2010 10:04 AM

I liked Screwtape the character. He reminded me of someone I might like to interview as long as I had a vial of holy water sitting nearby. I also liked Long John Silver (the real one, although Tim Curry in the Muppet movie version was fun, too).

I suppose that means that I have a liking for the character of the affable villan. I do like them to stay villans and not turn into the good guy most of the time, though. I also like the grey area heroes, like Lazarus Long and his kindred. And it made me remember that I should add The Wife of Bath to my list; she quite broke the mold for Chaucer's time.

This list has caused me to go to the bookstore twice this week. Congratulations on doing your part to spur the economy!

Posted by: UinenMaia at March 6, 2010 08:56 PM

Heh. My favorites in the area of Disney films have always been the villains. Especially when they are animated. They had some of the best lines and the most deliciously evil overtones.

My favorite line from 'Sleeping Beauty' was 'They're a disgrace to the forces of evil.'

Cruella De Vil, Captain Hook, Professor Ratigan,
and Yzma. Even Gaston was seriously vile, and I thought it was a heaux when I read that Donny Osmond was playing Gaston in the stage production of 'Beauty and the Beast.' I guess that was casting against type...but I heard he did a great job.

I wonder if he sang 'Puppy Love' to Beast...

There are others, but those are my favorites.

Posted by: Cricket at March 7, 2010 02:33 PM

Dorothea Casaubon -- Yes! Also George Smiley, and Stephen Maturin, Diana Villiers, and Jack Aubrey. Elizabeth Bennett.

On self-reliance: "It is the common fate of the indolent to see their rights become a prey to the active. The condition upon which God hath given liberty to man is eternal vigilance; which condition if he break, servitude is at once the consequence of his crime and the punishment of his guilt." -- John Philpot Curran

Posted by: Texan99 at March 8, 2010 11:40 AM

I've just looked at the character list. I like some of them very much: Oskar Maskerath, Humbert Humbert, Margaret Schlegel, Rhett Butler, Hamlet, the Vicomte de Valmont.

Posted by: Texan99 at March 8, 2010 11:58 AM

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